The Social Network (Facebook Movie)

07Jul09

No script link today. Sorry. 😦

Genre: Drama
Premise: A look at the rise of Facebook and the effect it’s had on its founders.
About: Aaron Sorkin was commissioned by Sony and producer Scott Rudin to write a movie about Facebook. Interestingly, Sorkin had little to no knowledge of Facebook when he got the job. He’s self-proclaimed computer ignorant, which makes some of the scenes in the script all the more remarkable. It’s been highly publicized that David Fincher is interested in taking over the reigns for the project. David, if you’re listening to me now, you can make this film. But please make Passengers first.
Writer: Aaron Sorkin (1st Draft)

First of all, Sony’s a little late to the party. There’s already a Facebook movie in production. And I have the exclusive first look!

I think it goes without saying that as soon as Facebook supplanted Myspace as the de facto online time-wasting mechanism, the studios were looking for ways to profit off of it. So they paid Aaron Sorkin 6.2 bajillion dollars to write “the Facebook movie”. An epic story that would capture the drama of late-night status updates, the power of the poke, who and who not to limit profile access to, and of course, the all important and always necessary “delete friend” feature. Okay, well, maybe it wouldn’t be about those things per se. But it would be about computers and software and code and snobby rich kids. Still not exactly the seeds of compelling drama. Which is exactly why Sony decided on Sorkin to tend the garden.

I have it on good authority that this is Aaron Sorkin’s official Facebook picture.

So back in the day I used to work for this producer. He was new to Hollywood – Three years prior he’d created some hot piece of software that sold for a fortune. This left him with a ton money at a very young age and when you’re young and rich, what do you do? You make movies! He was actually a fun guy to work with. Even though he didn’t know a lot, he was smart enough to pick things up quickly. Raised on the first two seasons of Entourage, he liked living the Hollywood life just as much as he liked working in it. So a year into our relationship, he invited me to one of his lavish house parties. It was everything you’d imagine a party in the Hills to be. A lot of great-looking people, pool shenanigans, multiple bars, an overly energetic DJ (this is not me bragging btw; Culver City is much more my scene). As I was taking in the chaos, however, I noticed this quiet little fashion-challenged 30-something in the corner. He had this detached quality to him, like he was at the party but he wasn’t. Whatever his story was, I knew it had to be a lot more interesting than the last ten people I talked to (French Guy: “I’m directing this commercial in Germany.” Me: “Oh yeah? What for?” French Guy: “I cannot talk about it.”) So I made my way over and casually introduced myself. After some small talk I asked him, “So who do you know here?” “Oh,” he said, “The owner of the house.” “Yeah?” I asked. “How?” “I’m his brother.”

This answer was quite puzzling. I had known this producer for over a year and we’d had thousands of conversations but he had never mentioned a brother. I continued to pry and the brother told me the story I’m telling you now: He and the producer co-founded the software company together. The first year was the best year of their lives. They didn’t make a cent but they were doing what they loved and they were doing it together. Then the company started experiencing success. That success led to more success and within a matter of months they were making millions of dollars. The company’s next steps were critical in determining how big they’d become. Millions of dollars were at stake. The brothers could not agree on a direction though. The producer wanted to grow as fast as possible (more money). The brother wanted to retain the quality of the company and slow down (less money). Things got so bad that in the end, the producer, who had a slight majority in the company, fired his brother. The brother told me he hadn’t spoken to him in over 2 years and that these parties were the only times he got to see him (he was never invited. He just showed up). Although he now had more money than he had ever dreamed of, he said if he could do it all over again, he never would’ve started that company. Two things came out of that night. One, I’ll never forget the sadness in that man’s eyes. And two, I never looked at money the same way again.

Naturally, all of this came roaring back to me after reading “The Social Experiment.” Instead of a story about brothers though, this is a story about two friends – one a computer genius, the other a business expert – who began a website that became the fastest growing phenomenon in internet history. Three years later, one was suing the other for 600 million dollars (or 1/30th of Mark Zuckerberg’s worth). It’s a story about greed, about obsession, about our belief that all the money in the world can make us happy. But it’s also unpredictable, funny, touching, and sad. It gives us that rare glimpse into the improbable world of mega-success.

We start out in a campus bar with a young couple. The guy is Mark Zuckerberg, a slightly cooler Bill Gates. The girl is Erica, his girlfriend. The two are having a conversation. Actually, they’re having five conversations because Mark can’t focus on one thing. He’ll occasionally backtrack into a previous conversation within the flow of the current conversation, all while preparing for the next conversation. He’s clearly smart as hell, but the habit makes him incredibly annoying. Add a side of selfishness and an order of condescension and we can see why Erica becomes more frustrated the longer the conversation continues. Mark is so into his own problems, in fact, that he’s completely blindsinded when Erica breaks up with him.

Zuckerberg sporting the sandals.

Convincing himself that he could care less, Mark heads back to his Harvard dorm to do what any computer nerd does when he gets dumped by a girl he never should’ve landed in the first place. He starts blogging about it! “Blah blah blah, Erica’s the biggest bitch whore in the world…” But the dumping ignites Mark’s imagination and he comes up with an idea for a website – a sort of “Hot or Not” which allows Harvard guys to compare Harvard women against each other. His best friend Eduardo pops in to help him and they have the site live in less than an hour. Within half an hour after that, the site is so popular, it takes down the entire Harvard computer network. Though he manages to piss off a number of faculty (and Harvard women), Mark earns some ivy league street cred and makes a name for himself (not easy to do on the hallowed Harvard grounds).

The stunt also brings Mark to the attention of Cameron and Tyler: two extremely rich and handsome brothers who are star members of the Harvard row team. Impressed by his creativity and speed, they want him to code their new website – an exclusive Harvard “Myspace-like” network. Mark digs the idea and agrees to help. Over the next month, however, he starts dreaming up his own variation of the site: a social networking experience built on exclusivity. His site would work like real life. Someone could only know your personal details if they were friends with you (unlike Myspace which at the time let anybody know anything about anyone). An exclusive network of friends. He called it “TheFacebook.”


He and his best friend Eduardo come up with the plan – Mark is geek patrol and glues his fingers to the keyboard, Eduardo is business-central and plots the site’s future. The coding wizard needs less than a month to build the site. It goes live a few days later and takes off like a Malibu brush fire. Within weeks everyone at Harvard’s using it. Cameron and Tyler, still in the dark about Mark’s secondary endeavor, are eagerly awaiting their website code. Imagine their surprise when “theFacebook” shows up on every desktop in school. They demand Mark shut down the site but Mark’s already onto the next conversation. He expands into other Ivy league schools and continues to improve the interface. The success is both exciting and terrifying. Eduardo wants to be cautious and look for ways to monetize the site. Mark wants to grow and add more features.

It was only by chance then, that such a crucial juncture in the website’s existence fell upon the end of the school year. Eduardo had to go back to New York for an internship. Mark flew to Norcal to rub elbows with Silicon Valley. Little did either of them know that Mark was about to meet someone who would completely change the game.

Maybe you remember the name “Sean Parker”, maybe you don’t. Parker is the late-nineties time capsule that blew the music industry wide open, exposing their ridiculous CD markups when he co-founded Napster. When Parker falls into Sorkin’s mini-opus, it was like finding some old 8mm film with Jimi Hendrix and Elvis hanging out. You had no idea these guys knew each other! Parker, who at this point had lost every single penny to the record companies, was so poor he was couch-surfing between friends’ apartments. When he sees his ladyfriend playing on this new weird site, “theFacebook,” it’s as if his world’s been turned upside-down. He calls Mark and Eduardo asking for a meeting right away. A week later they meet at some swanky New York restaurant. Parker arrives a good half an hour late, and even without a penny to his name, rides in with the confidence of ten Michael Bay’s. He explains to them that he doesn’t want to crash their party or pitch them anything. He just wants to let them know how awesome they are. With that remark, he’s got places to be, so he’s up and gone as fast as he came, but not before casually dropping a suggestion: “Drop the “the” and just call it “Facebook.” “It’s cleaner,” Once gone, Eduardo turns to Mark. “What a douchebag,” Eduardo’s eyes say. But Mark’s googly giddy expression tells a different story. He’s a 13 year girl at her first Jonas Brothers concert. A mancrush is born.

Sean Parker

Needless to say, Parker *did* want to crash the party. He just wanted to make sure Mark’s parents weren’t around (Eduardo) when he showed up with the keg. With Eduardo back in NY, Parker made his pitch: “What are you doing with that guy?” he demanded. “He’s holding you back.” The more Parker points out how little Eduardo is doing, the more things Mark gives Parker to do. And to Parker’s credit, he gets things done. Working for free, he takes Facebook international within three weeks. Mark eventually hires Sean without telling Eduardo, giving him a 5% stake in the company. When Eduardo finds out about the tomfoolery, he makes a bold statement and freezes the company bank account, potentially putting Facebook in major jeopardy. It’s the last straw. Mark and Parker trick Eduardo into signing a contract that screws him out of hundreds of millions of dollars, effectively firing him. In the process, a friendship is destroyed.

The script ends with a chilling and heartbreaking scene. It’s 3 years later, with Mark being sued by Eduardo, Tyler and Cameron, for the full 16 billion dollars the company is worth. We’ve been cutting back and forth to this deposition over the course of the screenplay, and now the long day has ended. Mark sits alone in a dark room, in front of his computer, all the money in the world and not one true friend to show for it. Looking back to the last time he was happy – his relationship with Erica – he pulls up Facebook, the site he invented, slides the mouse up to “add friend” and sends her a friend request. Afterwards, despite the millions of daily operations requiring his attention at that moment, he waits for her to accept. He’ll wait forever if he has to.

Cameron and Tyler

The script is sprinkled with a lot more humor than I expected – to the point where I wondered if it should be classified as a comedy. What’s wonderful is that all of it works. Those unoriginal moments you’ve seen in every comedy spec written in the past year (including my own), where couples are arguing over Facebook-related issues (Girlfriend: “Why does your relationship status say you’re single??”) Well Sorkin uses them too. The only difference is that it’s happening to the inventors of Facebook. And so the unoriginal becomes original, the stuid becomes hilarious. — And don’t get me started on Sean Parker – a character that can become iconic if the film is made. The brash techy rock star revels in his own ego, and is a key player in why Facebook is on our computers today (Parker ended up selling his portion of the company for – I believe – a couple hundred million dollars).

Part of my love for this 162 page script is that Sorkin doesn’t use any discernible structure. I was constantly looking for a base, an obvious story or goal. And there isn’t any. 99% of the time when this happens, the script’s a disaster (don’t try it. just, don’t) But Sorkin uses some crazy unknown voodoo screenwriting tricks to keep us riveted. In the end, our curiosity is what drives the story as we’re wondering if Sean – who’s already sacrificed his personal life – will end up getting sacrificed out of a business as well. Did he indeed steal this idea from Cameron and Tyler? Or are these two spoiled brats lashing out because they can’t handle the one time things didn’t go their way?

The Social Network is a either a modern tragedy or a modern success story depending on how you look at it. Imagine going from nothing to a billionaire in less than a year. How do you even grasp that kind of success? How do you live a normal life? How do you address the constant lawsuits that eat into your everyday existence? And how do you do this at 22 years old? When I was 22, just scraping together enough money to buy a case of Busch Light Draft was a victory. Either way it’s fun to put yourself in Mark’s shoes and picture how you’d handle the situation.

I’m sure my attempts to grow Scriptshadow made this read a little more personal. And remembering that lonely brother at the party stirred up some emotions as well. Either way, this script really resonated with me. Which is why it makes it into my Top 10.

[ ] trash
[ ] barely kept my interest
[ ] worth the read
[x] impressive
[ ] genius

What I learned: Be inventive in how you reveal character. I loved Sean Parker in this script. Sorkin gives Parker this quirky little obsession with an old business associate who fucked him over during his Napster days. Parker has a stalker-like obsession with getting back at him and brings up his revenge plans at every opportunity. Not only is it hilarious, but it reveals Parker’s character. It takes a certain kind of person who can’t let go – who will stop at nothing to even the score. Basically: an insecure asshole. Normally, a writer will reveal an asshole by having him yell at someone else. How interesting is that? Take a cue from Sorkin and build a little obsession (or other quirk/habit) into your character – something that tells us exactly who they are.

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122 Responses to “The Social Network (Facebook Movie)”

  1. 1 Julian

    That Parker is a smart cookie, gota hate him for it, yet kinda admire him at the same time. He's like that Indian guy that latched onto that beach boy. Or some kind of Batman Villian.

  2. 2 Julian

    That Parker is a smart cookie, gota hate him for it, yet kinda admire him at the same time. He's like that Indian guy that latched onto that beach boy. Or some kind of Batman Villian.

  3. 3 Carson Reeves

    Exactly, he's such a snake. Then again, finally got him enough money to pay off half those bills to the record companies.

  4. 4 Carson Reeves

    Exactly, he's such a snake. Then again, finally got him enough money to pay off half those bills to the record companies.

  5. 5 Anonymous

    I truly want to believe this script is as good as you say it is Carson, but I just didn't connect with the plot at all. Why should I care about this college age kids? Yeah sure they created FACEBOOK, and what? This seems to me like a story that reads well on paper but a movie about the guys that created facebook? Why?

    If I was to say anything good about the movie is that I feel it has that Rules of Attraction vibe going for it? Rules was a pretty good movie?

  6. 6 Anonymous

    I truly want to believe this script is as good as you say it is Carson, but I just didn't connect with the plot at all. Why should I care about this college age kids? Yeah sure they created FACEBOOK, and what? This seems to me like a story that reads well on paper but a movie about the guys that created facebook? Why?

    If I was to say anything good about the movie is that I feel it has that Rules of Attraction vibe going for it? Rules was a pretty good movie?

  7. 7 Anonymous

    Did you read the review, anonymous? Because Carson gives a pretty good idea as to why. You don't think the idea of brash Ivy League-ers getting in over their heads, coming up with one of the most popular websites ever, making millions, and ultimately losing their friendship, all while still in their early twenties, could be an interesting movie?

    And why mention that mediocrity Rules Of Attraction? Because they're both set in college? Do you really think that's the only good movie ever made about college or college-aged students? Because… no.

  8. 8 Anonymous

    Did you read the review, anonymous? Because Carson gives a pretty good idea as to why. You don't think the idea of brash Ivy League-ers getting in over their heads, coming up with one of the most popular websites ever, making millions, and ultimately losing their friendship, all while still in their early twenties, could be an interesting movie?

    And why mention that mediocrity Rules Of Attraction? Because they're both set in college? Do you really think that's the only good movie ever made about college or college-aged students? Because… no.

  9. 9 Carson Reeves

    It doesn't seem like it would be good. I had strong reservations going into it for sure. But Sorkin wins you over.

  10. 10 Carson Reeves

    It doesn't seem like it would be good. I had strong reservations going into it for sure. But Sorkin wins you over.

  11. 11 Julian

    The way you were talking I thought this was going to be the script to hit your genuis bracket.

  12. 12 Julian

    The way you were talking I thought this was going to be the script to hit your genuis bracket.

  13. 13 Anonymous

    Sorkin is kinda the man. I would totes put my balls in a jar on a desk and trust he would only do brilliant things with them.

  14. 14 Anonymous

    Sorkin is kinda the man. I would totes put my balls in a jar on a desk and trust he would only do brilliant things with them.

  15. 15 Carson Reeves

    It's just a bit messy at times and the script doesn't have any huge dramatic moments. It's like one long constant burn. But it worked and I love when writers try something different and it works (it almost always ends up failing). I decided when I started the site that I wasn't going to play fast and loose with the genius label. I knew I would only give 1 or 2 scripts a year that rating so that it actually means something when it's given. That said – lol – it does read like I'm going to give it a genius rating.

  16. 16 Carson Reeves

    It's just a bit messy at times and the script doesn't have any huge dramatic moments. It's like one long constant burn. But it worked and I love when writers try something different and it works (it almost always ends up failing). I decided when I started the site that I wasn't going to play fast and loose with the genius label. I knew I would only give 1 or 2 scripts a year that rating so that it actually means something when it's given. That said – lol – it does read like I'm going to give it a genius rating.

  17. 17 Anonymous

    FYI…not a big thing but the creator of Napster is Shawn Fanning…

  18. 18 Anonymous

    FYI…not a big thing but the creator of Napster is Shawn Fanning…

  19. 19 Anonymous

    Saving the genius rating for Beverly Hills Cop 4 right?

  20. 20 Anonymous

    Saving the genius rating for Beverly Hills Cop 4 right?

  21. 21 Carson Reeves

    Thanks Anon, fixed it. Anon 2, although I haven't read BHCop 4 yet, with Ratner attached and box office megastar Eddie Murphy starring, how could it be bad? 🙂

  22. 22 Carson Reeves

    Thanks Anon, fixed it. Anon 2, although I haven't read BHCop 4 yet, with Ratner attached and box office megastar Eddie Murphy starring, how could it be bad? 🙂

  23. 23 Anonymous

    Carson, you seemed to like Buried a whole lot (as did I). How close was that one to making your top 25?

  24. 24 Anonymous

    Carson, you seemed to like Buried a whole lot (as did I). How close was that one to making your top 25?

  25. 25 Frantic Monkey

    Hey Carson, don't be too harsh on Bev. Cop 4. It's not that bad a read. Although I'm confident that any quality it does hold will be butchered by Ratner.

  26. 26 Frantic Monkey

    Hey Carson, don't be too harsh on Bev. Cop 4. It's not that bad a read. Although I'm confident that any quality it does hold will be butchered by Ratner.

  27. 27 Carson Reeves

    It was very close. What I'm starting to realize is that some scripts that have an immediate impact fade over time. So what I'm trying to do (except for today) is let the script sit for awhile. In a month or so I plan to rework my Top 25, as in retrospect, some scripts probably should have made it in (and maybe some others shouldn't have placed so high).

  28. 28 Carson Reeves

    It was very close. What I'm starting to realize is that some scripts that have an immediate impact fade over time. So what I'm trying to do (except for today) is let the script sit for awhile. In a month or so I plan to rework my Top 25, as in retrospect, some scripts probably should have made it in (and maybe some others shouldn't have placed so high).

  29. 29 Carson Reeves

    Oh, and thrillers in particular have that effect. Cause they're such visceral experiences that they really rev you up. Then later on you realize there wasn't much beyond that surface-level feeling. So I'm cautious about letting them in.

  30. 30 Carson Reeves

    Oh, and thrillers in particular have that effect. Cause they're such visceral experiences that they really rev you up. Then later on you realize there wasn't much beyond that surface-level feeling. So I'm cautious about letting them in.

  31. 31 jess

    Carson,

    Great review. Sorkin is one of the best writers working today. Studio 60 was criminally underrated; I thought it blew the shit outta its antipodes, 30 Rock (which, I know, is sacrilege to say). I can just imagine what Sorkin's done with the rich material Zuckerberg's short life has yielded.

    Speaking of your own site, I sense it building momentum, and people are starting to take notice. Your journalistic voice is one of the best I've read in years. Your rhythm, your dexterity with the language, it's like listening to smooth jazz.

    Who knows, in a couple years, you may not have to worry about selling that script anymore. After all, Nikki Finke just sold out for $14 mil.

    Indulge me: Carson Reeves, Tarson Meads, Wilsoneads… why do they all sound so alike?

  32. 32 jess

    Carson,

    Great review. Sorkin is one of the best writers working today. Studio 60 was criminally underrated; I thought it blew the shit outta its antipodes, 30 Rock (which, I know, is sacrilege to say). I can just imagine what Sorkin's done with the rich material Zuckerberg's short life has yielded.

    Speaking of your own site, I sense it building momentum, and people are starting to take notice. Your journalistic voice is one of the best I've read in years. Your rhythm, your dexterity with the language, it's like listening to smooth jazz.

    Who knows, in a couple years, you may not have to worry about selling that script anymore. After all, Nikki Finke just sold out for $14 mil.

    Indulge me: Carson Reeves, Tarson Meads, Wilsoneads… why do they all sound so alike?

  33. 33 200dollarsaday

    I see Firstshowing.net picked up on your review.

  34. 34 200dollarsaday

    I see Firstshowing.net picked up on your review.

  35. 35 Kingston Alomar

    I want to read this script so bad. If anyone has a copy, please e-mail to kingstonalomar@yahoo.com

  36. 36 Kingston Alomar

    I want to read this script so bad. If anyone has a copy, please e-mail to kingstonalomar@yahoo.com

  37. 37 Anonymous

    Am I the only one who thought that Sorkin's script was an adaptation of Ben Mezrich's new book:

    THE ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES: The Founding of Facebook A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal

  38. 38 Anonymous

    Am I the only one who thought that Sorkin's script was an adaptation of Ben Mezrich's new book:

    THE ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES: The Founding of Facebook A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal

  39. 39 Anonymous

    he doesnt even review the scripts. he doesnt have them. hes a huge liar! thats why he didnt post the script to inception, which he didnt read at all, moneyball, and this.

  40. 40 Anonymous

    he doesnt even review the scripts. he doesnt have them. hes a huge liar! thats why he didnt post the script to inception, which he didnt read at all, moneyball, and this.

  41. 41 anthuswilliams

    Dude, Inception was an April Fool's prank. He even said as much.

    Of course Carson has the scripts. He posted the link to Moneyball, but they told him to take them down. Some prodcos don't like their properties splashed all over the Internet before they can profit from it.

    I've been reading tons of the scripts Carson reviews, and every time his review is an accurate reflection of what is in the pages. You're just being an asshole.

  42. 42 anthuswilliams

    Dude, Inception was an April Fool's prank. He even said as much.

    Of course Carson has the scripts. He posted the link to Moneyball, but they told him to take them down. Some prodcos don't like their properties splashed all over the Internet before they can profit from it.

    I've been reading tons of the scripts Carson reviews, and every time his review is an accurate reflection of what is in the pages. You're just being an asshole.

  43. 43 Anonymous

    Sorkin's script is an adaptation of Ben Mezrich's new book: THE ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES. The book doesn't come out for a couple of weeks though. Some of the same people are involved that did "21". Also an adaptation of a Mezrich book.

  44. 44 Anonymous

    Sorkin's script is an adaptation of Ben Mezrich's new book: THE ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES. The book doesn't come out for a couple of weeks though. Some of the same people are involved that did "21". Also an adaptation of a Mezrich book.

  45. 45 Anonymous

    Didn't see see this already with different players:

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0168122/

  46. 46 Anonymous

    Didn't see see this already with different players:

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0168122/

  47. 47 Anonymous

    "Part of my love for this 162 page script is that Sorkin doesn't use any discernible structure. I was constantly looking for a base, an obvious story or goal. And there isn't any. 99% of the time when this happens, the script's a disaster (don't try it. just, don't) But Sorkin uses some crazy unknown voodoo screenwriting tricks to keep us riveted."

    Is this for a TV miniseries? 162 pages = warning sign. No goal/structure/voodoo = major warning sign. The tricks and beautiful writing won't translate to the screen without clear character motivations and solid story structure. Train wreck on the way if your statements are accurate.

  48. 48 Anonymous

    "Part of my love for this 162 page script is that Sorkin doesn't use any discernible structure. I was constantly looking for a base, an obvious story or goal. And there isn't any. 99% of the time when this happens, the script's a disaster (don't try it. just, don't) But Sorkin uses some crazy unknown voodoo screenwriting tricks to keep us riveted."

    Is this for a TV miniseries? 162 pages = warning sign. No goal/structure/voodoo = major warning sign. The tricks and beautiful writing won't translate to the screen without clear character motivations and solid story structure. Train wreck on the way if your statements are accurate.

  49. 49 danny

    Anybody read Sorkin's older Farnsworth Invention script?

    This sounds like it has some similarities to that, with the seemingly dull subject matter (inventing television vs inventing facebook) and the lack of a strong throughline, etc.

  50. 50 danny

    Anybody read Sorkin's older Farnsworth Invention script?

    This sounds like it has some similarities to that, with the seemingly dull subject matter (inventing television vs inventing facebook) and the lack of a strong throughline, etc.

  51. 51 Kyle Leonard

    Great review, can't wait to get my hands on this one. I had to switch over to Firefox to leave comments. What I'm wondering is when we are going to be lucky enough to see an Inception review. I noticed it's no longer in your 'looking for' section. And agreed, Culver City is the place to be. And live (in my case).

    thanks,

    Kyle

  52. 52 Kyle Leonard

    Great review, can't wait to get my hands on this one. I had to switch over to Firefox to leave comments. What I'm wondering is when we are going to be lucky enough to see an Inception review. I noticed it's no longer in your 'looking for' section. And agreed, Culver City is the place to be. And live (in my case).

    thanks,

    Kyle

  53. 53 Geoff

    "Is this for a TV miniseries? 162 pages = warning sign. No goal/structure/voodoo = major warning sign. The tricks and beautiful writing won't translate to the screen without clear character motivations and solid story structure. Train wreck on the way if your statements are accurate."

    Yikes, Anon. First of all, character motivations here seem crystal clear to me. Second of all, you're obviously not familiar with Sorkin or you wouldn't have any qualms with him writing either a 162-page script or a 162-page script that doesn't adhere to a particular structure. In fact, I'd only be worried if he turned in a script that WASN'T totally unhinged.

    Carson, I know we disagree on scripts often, but you're officially out of your fucking mind if you leave GOING THE DISTANCE ahead of anything Sorkin in your top ten. I mean, I'm proud of my script and all, but Jesus Christ, man.

    🙂

  54. 54 Geoff

    "Is this for a TV miniseries? 162 pages = warning sign. No goal/structure/voodoo = major warning sign. The tricks and beautiful writing won't translate to the screen without clear character motivations and solid story structure. Train wreck on the way if your statements are accurate."

    Yikes, Anon. First of all, character motivations here seem crystal clear to me. Second of all, you're obviously not familiar with Sorkin or you wouldn't have any qualms with him writing either a 162-page script or a 162-page script that doesn't adhere to a particular structure. In fact, I'd only be worried if he turned in a script that WASN'T totally unhinged.

    Carson, I know we disagree on scripts often, but you're officially out of your fucking mind if you leave GOING THE DISTANCE ahead of anything Sorkin in your top ten. I mean, I'm proud of my script and all, but Jesus Christ, man.

    🙂

  55. 55 Nicholas

    Carson, your blog is starting to get some serious hits. First Showing pulled quotes from your review for one of their most recent posts.

    http://www.firstshowing.net/2009/07/07/aaron-sorkins-facebook-script-might-actually-be-amazing/

    ~ Nicholas (12916studios)

  56. 56 Nicholas

    Carson, your blog is starting to get some serious hits. First Showing pulled quotes from your review for one of their most recent posts.

    http://www.firstshowing.net/2009/07/07/aaron-sorkins-facebook-script-might-actually-be-amazing/

    ~ Nicholas (12916studios)

  57. 57 jess

    Congrats, Geoff, on the talent you've managed to gather for GTD. Especially for Nanette Burstein, producer of AMERICAN TEEN, a criminally under seen documentary. Burstein is masterful with character, which I'm certain will serve your script well. Full speed ahead.

    Agree with you on Sorkin, though. :o) The man is a writing god. Loved his homage to NETWORK in the Studio 60 pilot. And his pitch perfect dialogue in A FEW GOOD MEN is dizzying. The man's got some kind of ear, hasn't he? And to think he's not even on mushrooms anymore.

  58. 58 jess

    Congrats, Geoff, on the talent you've managed to gather for GTD. Especially for Nanette Burstein, producer of AMERICAN TEEN, a criminally under seen documentary. Burstein is masterful with character, which I'm certain will serve your script well. Full speed ahead.

    Agree with you on Sorkin, though. :o) The man is a writing god. Loved his homage to NETWORK in the Studio 60 pilot. And his pitch perfect dialogue in A FEW GOOD MEN is dizzying. The man's got some kind of ear, hasn't he? And to think he's not even on mushrooms anymore.

  59. 61 Nicholas

    Also, I have to say that your blog is quickly becoming one of my favorites. As Jess said, your journalistic style is brilliant. I love how you have started pulling from your own life as you review things. It makes it even easier to connect with what's written, and it also calls for a much more fascinating read, as it has these human quality to it.

    Now I just wish you would post more.

    And I see I may not have been the first to mention that your review got linked to by First Showing. Still, that's a pretty big site in terms of film news, so getting pulled from is kinda huge.

  60. 62 Nicholas

    Also, I have to say that your blog is quickly becoming one of my favorites. As Jess said, your journalistic style is brilliant. I love how you have started pulling from your own life as you review things. It makes it even easier to connect with what's written, and it also calls for a much more fascinating read, as it has these human quality to it.

    Now I just wish you would post more.

    And I see I may not have been the first to mention that your review got linked to by First Showing. Still, that's a pretty big site in terms of film news, so getting pulled from is kinda huge.

  61. 63 Kyle Leonard

    I couldn't be happier. Just got home an saw this script sitting in my inbox. Finally something that I'm excited to read has made it's way to me.

  62. 64 Kyle Leonard

    I couldn't be happier. Just got home an saw this script sitting in my inbox. Finally something that I'm excited to read has made it's way to me.

  63. 65 Carson Reeves

    Hey guys. Yeah, it's exciting. I got quoted on the Forbes site. Never in my life did I think I'd be quoted…by Forbes.

    Geoff, your script made me laugh my ass off. That's why it's so high. I pray every day that Drew and Justin stay together until production.

    I have no idea how this script got out so fast (everybody seems to have it now). I didn't give it to anyone. Maybe the review sparked some people's interest and the floodgates opened from there. Who knows.

    Yes, Alex over at Firstshowing is a fan of the site. Very nice of him to post that piece because that seems to be what all the other outlets picked up on.

    I'm going back to reviewing smaller scripts for awhile though. Much less stress. 🙂

  64. 66 Carson Reeves

    Hey guys. Yeah, it's exciting. I got quoted on the Forbes site. Never in my life did I think I'd be quoted…by Forbes.

    Geoff, your script made me laugh my ass off. That's why it's so high. I pray every day that Drew and Justin stay together until production.

    I have no idea how this script got out so fast (everybody seems to have it now). I didn't give it to anyone. Maybe the review sparked some people's interest and the floodgates opened from there. Who knows.

    Yes, Alex over at Firstshowing is a fan of the site. Very nice of him to post that piece because that seems to be what all the other outlets picked up on.

    I'm going back to reviewing smaller scripts for awhile though. Much less stress. 🙂

  65. 67 Brian

    Film School Rejects is also referring to you now.

  66. 68 Brian

    Film School Rejects is also referring to you now.

  67. 69 Johnny Meatworth

    so how is Sorkin going to do his walk-and-talk scenes with a bunch of people sitting at computers uploading drunk pics of themselves?

  68. 70 Johnny Meatworth

    so how is Sorkin going to do his walk-and-talk scenes with a bunch of people sitting at computers uploading drunk pics of themselves?

  69. 71 Aaron

    I was afraid when I finally had a chance to read the script I'd be a little let down by the expectations your review kind of set up, but man, that's a good script. It really didn't feel like it was 162 pages.

  70. 72 Aaron

    I was afraid when I finally had a chance to read the script I'd be a little let down by the expectations your review kind of set up, but man, that's a good script. It really didn't feel like it was 162 pages.

  71. 73 Anonymous

    If anyone has this script I would love to read it.

    Thanks

    Milesama@yahoo.com

  72. 74 Anonymous

    If anyone has this script I would love to read it.

    Thanks

    Milesama@yahoo.com

  73. 75 Anonymous

    Same here. Aaron, or anyone who wouldn't mind sharing the script…

    theohoff20@gmail.com

    Thanks in advance.

  74. 76 Anonymous

    Same here. Aaron, or anyone who wouldn't mind sharing the script…

    theohoff20@gmail.com

    Thanks in advance.

  75. 77 Aaron

    sorry, I was given a hard copy.

  76. 78 Aaron

    sorry, I was given a hard copy.

  77. 79 Anonymous

    No worries. Thanks for the reply.

  78. 80 Anonymous

    No worries. Thanks for the reply.

  79. 81 Kingston Alomar

    Just got done reading this script. Wow. Aaron Sorkin is a goddamn sorcerer when it comes to dialogue. This screenplay made me feel so many different emotions, I can't even explain them.

    If I ever had been a Facebook user in my lifetime, I would have cancelled it right after reading this. Zuckerberg is douche and was a grimy bastard for what he did to his business partner. The fact that he made billions of dollars just because he was a whiny little bitch because his girlfriend called him out on his BS and he wanted to vent by creating an "exclusive" online blog for college students, just leaves a sick taste in my mouth. That's just not right. I congratulate him, but f*** him.

    And only Sorkin would have been able to accomplish that. Beautiful script.

    Genius. Easily.

  80. 82 Kingston Alomar

    Just got done reading this script. Wow. Aaron Sorkin is a goddamn sorcerer when it comes to dialogue. This screenplay made me feel so many different emotions, I can't even explain them.

    If I ever had been a Facebook user in my lifetime, I would have cancelled it right after reading this. Zuckerberg is douche and was a grimy bastard for what he did to his business partner. The fact that he made billions of dollars just because he was a whiny little bitch because his girlfriend called him out on his BS and he wanted to vent by creating an "exclusive" online blog for college students, just leaves a sick taste in my mouth. That's just not right. I congratulate him, but f*** him.

    And only Sorkin would have been able to accomplish that. Beautiful script.

    Genius. Easily.

  81. 83 Anonymous

    Is everyone who's reading this doing so with a hard copy?

  82. 84 Anonymous

    Is everyone who's reading this doing so with a hard copy?

  83. 85 Anonymous One

    If anyone would like to share, I'd love to read a copy of the script. As I've done in the past, I'll be glad to return the favor. The last script I shared ended up being reviewed by the man, himself, Carson. (The Only Living Boy in New York.)

    I'll sent you some new options. Thanks in advance.

    And congratulations to you, Carson. I saw your review made it to Hollywood Wiretap.

    pathofleast@gmail.com

  84. 86 Anonymous One

    If anyone would like to share, I'd love to read a copy of the script. As I've done in the past, I'll be glad to return the favor. The last script I shared ended up being reviewed by the man, himself, Carson. (The Only Living Boy in New York.)

    I'll sent you some new options. Thanks in advance.

    And congratulations to you, Carson. I saw your review made it to Hollywood Wiretap.

    pathofleast@gmail.com

  85. 87 Anonymous

    Do you have a link?! Pleeease! 🙂

  86. 88 Anonymous

    Do you have a link?! Pleeease! 🙂

  87. 89 Carson Reeves

    Guys, please don't post links to this in the comments. You're going to get the site in trouble.

  88. 90 Carson Reeves

    Guys, please don't post links to this in the comments. You're going to get the site in trouble.

  89. 91 Aaron C

    Carson,
    How much has your traffic gone up since you posted this review? With that Forbes shoutout I'm seeing you all over the place now.

  90. 92 Aaron C

    Carson,
    How much has your traffic gone up since you posted this review? With that Forbes shoutout I'm seeing you all over the place now.

  91. 93 Carson Reeves

    It's pretty much doubled. Yeah, it made its way into the tech sector today so I'm getting a lot of hits from those sites. I don't think any of those people are interested in the long-term script market though. So if I can make *them* hang around, then maybe I am doing something right. 🙂

  92. 94 Carson Reeves

    It's pretty much doubled. Yeah, it made its way into the tech sector today so I'm getting a lot of hits from those sites. I don't think any of those people are interested in the long-term script market though. So if I can make *them* hang around, then maybe I am doing something right. 🙂

  93. 95 Nicholas

    Here's hoping you can make them stick around then, Carson.

  94. 96 Nicholas

    Here's hoping you can make them stick around then, Carson.

  95. 97 Anonymous One

    Carson,

    I read the script and I was impressed, but I'm betting most, if not all, the material comes from the book. Before you stick it permanently in your top 25, my recommendation is that you read the book. If you don't have time, maybe one of your readers could compare the book to the script.

    The script is a piece of literature more than a film. The cross-cutting is the only cinematic element at this point. I'm not saying Fincher (whom, like you I admire greatly) couldn't turn it into a film, but I'm not betting on it either.

    If Sorkin wrote all the dialogue and crafter the characters, then he deserves all the credit. But if most of it is from the book, then, again it comes down to the cross-cutting which is great, but not enough to put it in your top 25.

    Anyway, hope you're number of hits continues to grow. Keep up the good work.

    Best,
    Anonymous One

  96. 98 Anonymous One

    Carson,

    I read the script and I was impressed, but I'm betting most, if not all, the material comes from the book. Before you stick it permanently in your top 25, my recommendation is that you read the book. If you don't have time, maybe one of your readers could compare the book to the script.

    The script is a piece of literature more than a film. The cross-cutting is the only cinematic element at this point. I'm not saying Fincher (whom, like you I admire greatly) couldn't turn it into a film, but I'm not betting on it either.

    If Sorkin wrote all the dialogue and crafter the characters, then he deserves all the credit. But if most of it is from the book, then, again it comes down to the cross-cutting which is great, but not enough to put it in your top 25.

    Anyway, hope you're number of hits continues to grow. Keep up the good work.

    Best,
    Anonymous One

  97. 99 YRG

    Hi, great site! Found it on the NY Daily News website. They got the link wrong, listing Scriptshadow.com instead, but I found you through a search. The Accidental Billionaires (the book) has a Facebook page that listed the News article. Thanks for the write up on the script. It's too bad you had to take it down. If anyone has it, can you send it to me at uwriteto@gmail.com? I can trade a recent script for it. Thanks!

  98. 100 YRG

    Hi, great site! Found it on the NY Daily News website. They got the link wrong, listing Scriptshadow.com instead, but I found you through a search. The Accidental Billionaires (the book) has a Facebook page that listed the News article. Thanks for the write up on the script. It's too bad you had to take it down. If anyone has it, can you send it to me at uwriteto@gmail.com? I can trade a recent script for it. Thanks!

  99. 101 Carson Reeves

    From what I've heard, the book has very little dialogue, and Sorkin's script is full of dialogue. So I think Sorkin gets credit there. And yes, the only cinematic element is the cross-cutting. It will be challenging to turn this into a film, no doubt. That's why they need Fincher.

  100. 102 Carson Reeves

    From what I've heard, the book has very little dialogue, and Sorkin's script is full of dialogue. So I think Sorkin gets credit there. And yes, the only cinematic element is the cross-cutting. It will be challenging to turn this into a film, no doubt. That's why they need Fincher.

  101. 103 Aaron C

    Mike Nichols could do it.

    Also, A FEW GOOD MEN wasn't exactly overflowing with cinematic elements and that came out okay.

  102. 104 Aaron C

    Mike Nichols could do it.

    Also, A FEW GOOD MEN wasn't exactly overflowing with cinematic elements and that came out okay.

  103. 105 Anonymous One

    Carson,

    Agreed. The dialogue in the script is a thing of beauty. And the dialogue is the script. It's the action, the character, the tension, the plot points, everything. If he created it, then he deserves your high praise (as well as mine and everyone else who appreciates great writing.)

    Anonymous One

  104. 106 Anonymous One

    Carson,

    Agreed. The dialogue in the script is a thing of beauty. And the dialogue is the script. It's the action, the character, the tension, the plot points, everything. If he created it, then he deserves your high praise (as well as mine and everyone else who appreciates great writing.)

    Anonymous One

  105. 107 Anonymous

    carson just makes everything up! all these reviews are fake! he makes every one up and pretends to review them. hes not funny or creative. the hangover script- fake. couple of dicks script- fake and if he is such a good person why doesnt he just post the script link?

  106. 108 Anonymous

    carson just makes everything up! all these reviews are fake! he makes every one up and pretends to review them. hes not funny or creative. the hangover script- fake. couple of dicks script- fake and if he is such a good person why doesnt he just post the script link?

  107. 109 Carson Reeves

    I don't make *all* of them up. Only about 80%

  108. 110 Carson Reeves

    I don't make *all* of them up. Only about 80%

  109. 111 Anonymous

    FOR REAL! A SCENE LEAKED LAST NIGHT ON YOUTUBE OF THE FILM! LOOKS AMAZING… THE LEAD ACTOR IS A REAL FAMOUS DOUCHEBAG THOUGH! CHECK IT OUT IF ITS STIL UP:

  110. 112 Anonymous

    FOR REAL! A SCENE LEAKED LAST NIGHT ON YOUTUBE OF THE FILM! LOOKS AMAZING… THE LEAD ACTOR IS A REAL FAMOUS DOUCHEBAG THOUGH! CHECK IT OUT IF ITS STIL UP:

  111. 113 Carson Reeves

    Cool, I have spammers in my comments section. This must mean I've made it. 🙂

  112. 114 Carson Reeves

    Cool, I have spammers in my comments section. This must mean I've made it. 🙂

  113. 115 Ricky J

    I LOVED this script. Can't believe it was 160 pages because it just flew. The cross-cutting between depositions worked brilliantly.

    And the conflict inherent in the real-life events makes this great material to work with. You don't have to worry about raising the stakes when everybody stands to make hundreds of millions, if not billions.

    There's a pretty long excerpt of the Mezrich book here: http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/book_extracts/article6688863.ece

    It's all the same stuff as in the script but I'm sure most of the dialogue genius goes to Sorkin. I flipped through an advance copy of this book today and it felt like such a snooze after reading this script.

  114. 116 Ricky J

    I LOVED this script. Can't believe it was 160 pages because it just flew. The cross-cutting between depositions worked brilliantly.

    And the conflict inherent in the real-life events makes this great material to work with. You don't have to worry about raising the stakes when everybody stands to make hundreds of millions, if not billions.

    There's a pretty long excerpt of the Mezrich book here: http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/book_extracts/article6688863.ece

    It's all the same stuff as in the script but I'm sure most of the dialogue genius goes to Sorkin. I flipped through an advance copy of this book today and it felt like such a snooze after reading this script.

  115. 117 Uminn

    If anyone is willing to share a copy of the script, I'd love to read it.

    Uminnleg@gmail.com

    Thanks in advance.

  116. 118 Uminn

    If anyone is willing to share a copy of the script, I'd love to read it.

    Uminnleg@gmail.com

    Thanks in advance.

  117. 119 99celt

    Anyone know where I can get a hold of this script… I really want to read it.

    99celtic@gmail.com

    Cheers!

  118. 120 99celt

    Anyone know where I can get a hold of this script… I really want to read it.

    99celtic@gmail.com

    Cheers!

  119. 121 PTMaatta

    Yeah, I mean this script is already out there. Why not toss it our way?

  120. 122 PTMaatta

    Yeah, I mean this script is already out there. Why not toss it our way?


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